5 Best Places to See Maple Leaves in Taiwan

A definite chill in the air coupled with the sly, subtle change of season that leaves an unmistakable colorful flair — soon it’ll be the time of the year where summer melts into autumn again. Autumn in Taiwan is ideal for a visit, the weather is much more welcoming and the beautiful nature and maple trees make it visually stunning too. KKday scouted the whole of Taiwan to bring you the 5 best spots for maple trees in Taiwan!

1. Xiao Wulai Scenic Area

Small waterfall in Xiao Wulai Scenic Area (kuangchih cheng)

Xiao Wulai Scenic Area is blessed with stunning natural beauty, waterfalls and lush forests add the distinct autumnal flavor provided by the maple trees. Other than snapping your Instagram photos, prepare to be amazed by the outstanding amount of activities you can do in this nature lover’s heaven. Don’t forget to slow down your footsteps and appreciate the smaller things the wonders of nature can offer you while strolling through the beautiful sea of red.

Maple leaf (Carol Lin)

If you’re interested in cultural experiences, visit Wulai Atayal Museum for an in-depth explanation of the rituals, religious faith, customs and history of Atayal, Taiwan’s second largest aboriginal group. Who knows, you might be deeply enlightened by their way of life!

After you’ve enjoyed the display of colors by the maple trees, feasted your eyes on Xiao Wulai Waterfall, indulged in Atayal‘s culture, it’s time to whet your tastebuds with the snacks sold by the streets! After all, what’s a visit to Taiwan without satisfying your street food cravings?

Address:
No. 34, Pubu Rd, Wulai District, New Taipei City, 233

Operating hours for Wulai Atayal Museum:
9:30am to 5pm

2. Malabon Hill

Malabon Hill (Ban Jie)

Raved by hikers and trekkers from all over Taiwan for its stunning display of colour during autumn, Manapan Mountain is also one of the best location in Taiwan for maple viewing according to locals.

Maple leaves (Ming-yen Hsu)

Nature lovers, rejoice! Manapan Mountain is home to a diversity of floral and fauna, making it the perfect place for you to wander around and observe them in their natural habitat. History lovers, you’d be please to know that Manapan Mountain holds remnant of how Taiwan defended against the Japanese during WWII. Go forth and explore!

Address:
264 Miaoli Country, Tahu Town, Taiwan

3. Aowanta National Forest Recreation Area

Bridge at Aowanta National Forest Recreation Area (Ares Hsu)

Located in Renai Town, Nantou County, Aowanta has a reputation amongst Taiwanese as the ultimate place to enjoy maple trees during autumn. It’d be wise for all travellers to heed the advice of locals!

Maple trees

Admire the maple leaves at the recreation area surrounded by the north and south stream before trekking along the 1.1km trail that leads you to three waterfalls. Time to stock up some Instagram pictures to post when you’re back home! Take a deep breathe and clear your lungs when you stroll around the forest, let the gentle breeze caress you as the droplets from the waterfall splash against your face. Ahhh, what a time to be alive.

Address:
546 Nantou County, Ren’ai Township, Taiwan

Operating hours:
8am to 5pm

4. Shimen Water Depot

Sure, you like to take things slow because you have all the time in the world when traveling, but bad traffic is definitely the one thing that hits the sore spot of everyone.

Shimen Water Depot (Sui Yue Zhi Ge)

You’re in luck because Shimen Dam has an unbelievably low level of traffic throughout the year.

Maple leaves in Shimen Water Depot (Buddy8d)


Shihmen Dam
 sounds like a place that’s too boring to even make it to your itinerary, but you’ll be delighted to know that the dam has a maple trail with absolutely phenomenon maple views during autumn. With warm colours splashed out all over accompanied by the cool blue of the water, Shihmen Dam provides a sight you don’t want to miss in autumn. Here’s the best part: a Maple Festival is held every autumn, allowing visitors a taste of the area’s best catch — fresh sashimi!

Address:
Taoyuan City, Longtan Area

5. Taipingshan National Forest Recreation Area

Taiping Shan National Forest Recreation Area (Ray Yu)

You’ve seen red, orange and brown maple leaves but have you seen purple ones? Red maple leaves are a common sighting all year round on Taipingshan and purple maple leaves only appear during autumn. Don’t be too taken aback when you see the entire place decorated with purple maple leaves instead of the usual ocean of red ones!

Purple maple leaves (F. D. Richards)

If you wish to tour the whole of Taipingshan, hop on to a motor-tricycle to have the entire Taipingshan ingrained in your memory. You can also relieve your muscle aches accumulated through the long hours sitting in front a screen by soaking in a hot spring found at the foot of the mountain.

Address:
267 Taiping Lane, Nan’ao Yilan County No. 1 of 58

Operating hours:
Monday to Friday: 6am to 8pm
Saturday and public holidays: 4am to 8pm
Summer holidays (July and August): 3:30am to 8pm

Summer is ending and autumn is just around the corner; hurry and get your notebook out and start planning your itinerary to Taiwan this autumn! Stressing about what else to do in Taiwan? KKday has a few guides for you.

>> Your Complete Guide to Kenting
>> The Most Comprehensive Guide to Green Island
>> 10 Things you Must Eat in Penghu

Need some help booking your travel tours?

>> Classic Taichung Night Tour
>> Sunrise Tour to Yangmingshan
>> Taipei Night Walking Tour

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1 Comment

  1. Anonymous
    September 20, 2016

    Hello!

    May I find out whether the autumn leaves have turned red around October in Taipei? Or is that too early?

    Thanks!

Comments are closed.